3 Tips for Insurance CX Programs Looking to Collect Valuable CX Data

Insurance brands have a unique set of challenges to overcome in order to find the valuable customer experience (CX) data they need to improve experiences. Insurance customers are buying into a long-term relationship, which means building brand trust is extremely important to keep customer retention rates high. And for insurance CX programs, customer data is a key source of information that can help insurance companies cultivate a growing trust with their consumers. 

So how do you collect the most valuable feedback from your customers? We have three tips for you to apply to your own CX strategies:

Tip #1: It’s Time to Rethink the Voice of Customer

For insurance CX programs, listening to the voice of customer shouldn’t mean collecting as much data as possible. Instead, the goal should be to collect the data that matters. For example, many insurance CX programs survey with metric-based questions and get consistently high scores from customers. But what they’re not receiving is actionable feedback to improve further. This can be solved by focusing more on unstructured questions to allow customers to actually express what they’re thinking about. 

Another important thing to consider when listening to the Voice of Customer is when your CX team is listening along the customer journey. That can matter just as much as the type of questions you’re asking. So think about the different touchpoints that pose potential for valuable CX data. 

Insurance CX programs commonly hone in on claim submission with their surveys, but it’s actually rare for a customer to do so in the first place. On the other hand, paying bills is a much more frequent action that customers take and could give your program greater access to the Voice of Customer. 

What kind of questions you ask and when you ask them in the customer journey can make a big difference in the data you’ll collect.

Tip #2: Are Traditional Surveys Really Your Best Bet?

The next question you have to ask is, “are surveys really the best way to engage customers?” Traditionally, surveys have been a core part of CX programs for insurance brands but it’s time to move beyond that. In our 2022 Experience Trends Report we discovered that Gen Z customers and employees in the U.S. are about 19-22% likely to complete a traditional survey.

This doesn’t mean we should discard survey methods for the rest of time, however. It just means we need to evolve with customers’ expectations. Providing channels other than traditional surveys for customer feedback—like video, microsurveys, or speech—can help your insurance CX program reach a wider range of the customers you’re trying to cater to. 

Tip #3: Remember, CX Data Is for Proving ROI

Executives in insurance companies have a specific language they speak—and communicating with them effectively is the best way you can prove Return on Investment (ROI). The CX data on its own isn’t enough, you need to translate numbers and comments into meaning. When you speak your C-Suite’s language, your executives will be onboard with your program and you’ll have more opportunities to build that high level of trust with customers. 

This is especially crucial since insurance customers are in it for the long run. If they don’t believe your business is improving customer satisfaction efforts overtime, then their loyalty will dwindle. If your insurance brand has customers who have been with you for years, it’s in your best interest to make their voice heard among your executive board.

Want more tips on how to improve your insurance brand’s CX program? Check out this video about understanding customer expectations from InMoment Client, Aegon!

3 Ways to Capture Non-Purchaser Feedback to Improve Experiences

When it comes to collecting feedback, of course we want to hear what our actual customers have to say about their experience. But, what about those individuals who have yet to make a purchase? Without a transaction, these non-purchasers won’t receive an invitation to take a survey—but, their experience is just as important to listen to and understand. In fact, non-purchaser feedback can offer you additional perspective that you wouldn’t get otherwise.

Non-purchaser feedback is valuable for many reasons—it can help point your brand to the reasons why customers might not be completing transactions as well as help you discover critical experience gaps in the customer journey

Here are three customer experience (CX) solutions you can use to connect with and understand the experience of non-purchasers:

Solution #1: Use a Digital Intercept on Your Website

One of the most prominent solutions is to use digital intercepts on your website. An example of this is Foot Locker—this retail brand uses an ‘always on’ listening tab on their homepage that collects feedback from both customers and non-purchasers. 


When it comes to connecting with customers that haven’t completed a purchase, digital intercepts are a creative solution for collecting feedback. For example, Foot Locker uses a web survey that pops up in an iframe after customers browse for more than five minutes, if they abandon their cart items, or if they return using the same IP address multiple times without completing a transaction. 

These are all opportunities to engage with your customers and better understand their experience, allowing you to better inform your business on what actions need to be taken to improve these experiences—and improve conversation rates.  

Solution #2: Encourage Employees to Invite Non-Purchasers to Participate 

Because the employee experience (EX) is tied so closely to the customer experience (CX), of course we recommend to involve your frontline staff as much as possible in your overall CX program. These employees can be your greatest asset when it comes to connecting with non-purchasers. 

Many retailers use posters throughout the store to encourage feedback, and others will hand out QR codes on cards to shoppers if they leave empty handed. Simply asking staff to promote the feedback program to both customers and non-purchasers will boost the volume of feedback and insights for your business, and help you understand more about the in-store experience gaps and opportunities to improve. 

Having a CX program that incorporates the voice of employee is a modern day ‘must’. Make sure you have an easily accessible channel for your employees to share the feedback that they are hearing from customers each day. It is far too valuable to ignore! 

Solution #3: Consolidate Your Solicited Customer Feedback with Your Unsolicited Social Feedback

Let’s face it, 80% or more of the customer feedback you’ll collect will come from customers, people that have made one or many purchases from your brand. A channel that is already rich in non-purchaser feedback is social. There are loads of reviews that exist today about your brand, about your website, or about the in-store experience that a non-purchaser has already shared. If you are reading and acting on these already, that’s terrific. 

The next step is then to consolidate all this rich non-purchaser feedback into your broader CX program. Having all your feedback in one location improves your level of understanding, broadens the range of customers you’ll hear from and leads to much clearer decision making across the whole of your business.

Digital Intercept: How to Collect Customer Feedback Without Ruining the Experience

We’ve all been there. You’re shopping for something online and you start to compare options on different websites. You’re excited to explore a particular item, but as soon as you click into the brand’s website, a little window pops up asking you what you think of the website experience. “What experience?” you think. “I barely just entered the page!”

This little pop-up window is more commonly known in the customer experience (CX) industry as an intercept or digital intercept. Though the use of a digital intercept has great intentions, the unfortunate truth is that it can often harm the customer experience more than it improves the experience. 

How Traditional Intercepts Damage the Experience

The ultimate goal of digital intercepts should be to get valuable feedback about your website and user experience so you can innovate and improve; however, some common practices can actually be perceived as intrusive, ill-timed, or irrelevant.

  1. Intrusive

When a customer is casually perusing a site, a random pop-up can feel intrusive to the overall experience; they can feel hassled or like their interaction with your site has been interrupted. Ultimately, what may have been meant as a well-intentioned prompt can feel invasive and could cause a customer to abandon your page.

  1. Ill-timed

If a survey window pops up as soon as a customer arrives at your homepage, your customer has not been able to get a good look at the full page, much less get an impression of how it functions or if they have any suggestions. Therefore, they most likely won’t have much feedback to give you—if they choose to participate in the survey at all. 

  1. Irrelevant

Traditional practices with intercepts are one-size-fits-all; very rarely are they customized to ask the right questions at the right time. This lack of customization means the questions asked are not directly relevant to a customer’s individual experience, leaving the brand with shallow feedback that won’t make a real difference.

What Are Best Practices for Digital Intercepts? 

The end goal of an intercept is not about collecting as much data as possible, but about giving customers the opportunity to provide useful data at the right time.

Here are some suggestions on how brands can do just that: 

Don’t: Create One-size-fits-all Intercept Surveys

Do: Map Out Possible Site Pathways for Customization

Instead of drafting one intercept survey to serve your entire site, consider all the different touchpoints you want to collect data from and then craft questions.

  • Keep in mind how users are browsing your site and craft intercepts around that information. For instance, a feedback tab may be perfect for desktop users, but it’s far too small in size for mobile users. Consider using a banner on your mobile site instead.
  • Be creative! Triggers can be used together to target specific user groups for feedback. For example, if you want to collect more feedback from customers in a specific state, you can set a trigger based on IP addresses.

Don’t: Ask Unnecessary or Irrelevant Questions

Do: Gear Questions Toward the User’s Specific Experience

In order to get the best feedback possible, you have to ask the right questions about the right experience for each type of customer. For instance, a question asking about the checkout experience would be irrelevant to a customer who has yet to make a purchase. Instead, set a trigger for an intercept to appear for a customer with a few lingering items in their bag to learn why they haven’t taken the plunge. 

  • Keep it simple. Surveys that are too long are less likely to be completed and also take away from the user experience. Try to keep it to a few high-quality questions so you can get the information you need without losing your customer’s attention.
  • Revisit the map of possible visitor pathways you created to help prescribe questions to specific user situations. The more tailored your questions can be to a customer scenario, the better. For example, you can ask specific questions targeting those who use the mobile site in order to improve the mobile design and experience.

Don’t: Have Something Pop Up Right Away

Do: Give Customers Time to Provide Informed Feedback 

The phrase “garbage in, garbage out” is especially relevant when you’re collecting data; if you aren’t collecting quality feedback, your insights won’t create real business impact. This is why it’s especially important to give your customers the opportunity to navigate your site before asking them to give you feedback.

  • Strategically place a feedback tab or another always-available channel on the website for instant feedback. This way, customers have the ability to provide you with feedback outside of the triggers you’ve set up.
  • Set up an intercept for customers who have lingered on the site for some time but haven’t made a purchase or reached out. This allows you to check in and see if they have any questions or concerns.

Enhance, Don’t Interrupt

Whenever you set up an intercept survey on your website, you should ask yourself if it will enhance or interrupt your customer’s experience. If you seek to enhance the experience with every question, you are well on your way to the best feedback, insights, and positive business impact.

How Inferred Feedback Can Support Traditional CX Survey Solutions for Next-Level Intelligence

Whether your customers are visiting your storefront, browsing your website, unboxing your product on TikTok, or reading a review site, consumers interact with your brand in countless ways and places. But how do customer experience (CX) programs keep up with a customer journey that is constantly changing? A good place to start is going beyond traditional survey solutions to include more modern methods, listening posts, channels, and feedback types—solicited, unsolicited, and inferred. 

Not all valuable feedback gathered is solicited in the form of surveys, focus groups, or interviews (also known as direct feedback in the CX world). There is a wealth of unsolicited—or indirect feedback—in call centre recordings, social media feedback, and web chat transcripts. A company can also use inferred feedback by tracking customers’ behaviours, contact frequency or purchasing habits.

This post is all about going beyond direct and indirect survey options and questionnaires, and expanding your program to include inferred feedback. When you meet customers where they are, however and whenever they’re interacting with your brand, you are opening the door to big picture understanding, big picture improvements, and, most importantly, big picture results.

So, What’s Inferred Customer Feedback All About?

According to Gartner analysts, inferred feedback is operational and behavioural data associated with a customers experience or customer journey, like a website’s clickstream data, mobile app location data, contact centre operational data, or ecommerce purchase history. 

Bringing Inferred Feedback to Life 

As an example of all three feedback sources working together, let’s imagine a shoe retailer’s CX team launching a new release sneaker in store—and they’re on the hunt for actionable intelligence. There are multiple touchpoints along the journey to analyse in order to launch this product successfully.

When customers buy shoes (or anything else) at the store, they are given scannable QR codes on each receipt for direct feedback. They might take the survey, rate their in-store experience, and say they buy shoes there every 12 months, on average. 

For indirect feedback, the CX team would also look at reviews on their mobile app, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube to see what customers are saying about the latest and greatest sneakers. We can use text analytics tools to find common data themes as well as positive, negative, and neutral sentiment in a customer’s verbatim feedback. The CX team can also look into web chat notes, which might show how many people have contacted you asking for more details, stock levels or sneaker quality in the past. 

The last step is to look at inferred feedback. When it comes to sneakers, it will be useful to look at purchase history through a CRM, a loyalty program, or a  customer’s store account, which will show an important operational and segmentation piece of the puzzle. From your analysis, you might learn a few things:

  • the average repurchase cycle is 18 months
  • those customers purchasing more frequently are your fanatics, more likely to be singing your praises and spreading the word
  • your neutral customers are being nice and predictable
  • the skeptical, non-loyalists come and go as they please

When you combine this behavioural insight with the direct and indirect feedback that corresponds to each segment, you are painting a better picture of what is driving customers to act in certain ways. 

Are the fanatics more forgiving of experiences, more excited, or even demanding more of you? What does this intelligence tell you to do? Increase stock levels, super-charge loyalty bonuses, or pivot?

When you put all of these pieces into your data lake, you now have all the information you need to form a rich, single view of the customer. From there, you can start making sense of the data and creating a world-class action plan. 

How Do I Take Action on Inferred Customer Data? 

A problem many businesses are facing is how to link all sources of collected feedback together, turn it into something they can act on, and truly transform their business. Luckily, we have a few tips for going beyond insights to take action:

Action Step #1: Get the Right Reports to the Right People

When it comes to bringing inferred data to life, optimised reports are a superpower. Spend the time up front to figure out which insights deliver relevant, actionable, and effective intelligence, then to get that intelligence to the right people. We recommend creating reports that are customised, metric-specific, and delivered in real-time, and then looking for those CX advocates in your business who have the power to do something with them.

Action Step #2: Put Your CRM Data to Work

Integrating CRM data with your traditional feedback data can be a game changer. It helps you understand more about the customer to create more informed, personalised interactions that can boost average basket size, increase purchase frequency and drive brand advocacy to new levels. 

Action Step #3: Resolve Issues Quickly

Your inferred data will show when customers are at risk of churning. This is a great opportunity to intervene quickly, and turn an unhappy customer into a lifelong advocate. One of the most important actions your CX program should take is responding to customer issues quickly and efficiently, be it negative feedback, a bad social review, or knowing a customer had a difficult time processing a refund.

If you’re looking forward to leveling up your retail customer experiences, check out this white paper: “How to Modernise Your Customer Feedback.”

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